I’m A Picky Eater

picky eaterMy friends comment on my eating habits pretty often. My roommate always tells people that I won’t eat anything with flavor. My boyfriend usually says, “plain Jane, wins again” when we are at a restaurant and I can’t decide whether to try something new or have my medium burger with American cheese and nothing else on it, I tend to go with the burger. I don’t eat condiments, most vegetables and fruits, anything spicy, no seafood …. the list goes on. There are many reasons for me being the picky eater that I am today.

My mom is a picky eater to begin with, but being one out of eleven children her parents always made her eat whatever was cooked that night. My mom hated some of my food she had to eat as a kid and decided that she would never do that to her kids. Thus, more picky eaters were born. My mom only cooked food that she would eat and so those were the foods we got used to. She didn’t use many spices (never garlic- since half of her family is allergic), never cooked seafood, and basically stuck to a simplistic menu that she knew we would eat willingly.

I typically started my day with a Devil Dog as I ran out of the house to get to school. That’s right, my mom had no problem with me grabbing a cream filled chocolate “cake” as my way to start out my day this way I could sleep until the very last minute. She said it was better than me grabbing nothing. Luckily for me, I inherited a very fast metabolism as well as athletic interests to keep me busy all day long so the 180 calories per “dog” didn’t really affect my weight. If we were out of Devil Dogs I would have an ice cream sandwich which my mom claimed was healthy enough since it was made from milk, therefore had some calcium. My dad, being a diabetic, nearly had a heart attack every time he noticed me and my siblings eating such sugar enhanced food right at the start of our day.

I think I had a typical lunch as a kid: a bologna sandwich every day (no crust of course) with some form of candy and chips. If I branched out, it would be with pizza or pasta.  Nothing spectacular because I was always saving up for my after school snack (typically candy of some sort).

One of the most important meals in my house was dinner. This was the only time when my whole family sat down together to eat. We waited until my dad came home from work, no matter what time that happened to be that night. Some nights we started dinner as late as 9-10pm. If that was the case, we would have some “crappy appys” such as bagel pizzas, nachos, or crackers and cheese to hold us over until it was time for family dinner. Dinner itself was always pretty big. A typical dinner would be: chicken, gravy, mashed potatoes, corn, and bread sticks. Most healthy eaters would be nervous about this combination of multiple starches and lack of color variety, yet at my house this was considered a good, healthy meal- probably my healthiest of the day.

I like to think that after going to college, I have really broadened my tastes and started to eat healthier (especially since I was a collegiate athlete). I still don’t like many vegetable, spices, or breakfast in general, but at least I am trying new foods. I think my health and eating habits would be better if my parents pushed healthier foods on me, but I am grateful that they just allowed me to be a kid and eat all the crappy food before the consequences started to show. Imagine what I would weigh if I ate a Devil Dog every morning now!

Photo Credit: tinfoilraccoon

Kim Angelovich I recently finished up my graduate degree in Marketing Analytics from Bentley University. My goal is work in advertising and eventually work on brand strategy. In my spare time I love playing sports, reading, and watching comedies.

View all posts by Kim Angelovich

7 Responses to “I’m A Picky Eater”

  1. Kate Vander Wiede

    Kim,

    I was a bit shocked when reading this. As a former unhealthy eater, I reformed my eating ways since starting college. I used to hate vegetables–now I could probably eat them every day, for every meal, and be a happy camper.

    I used to not care that the licorice i ate was composed of 50% Red 40, or that the popcorn at the movie theatres was drenched in a month’ worth of salt. I didn’t used to care about obesity, or diabetes, or how engineered foods could affect me in the future. I also didn’t think about the processes that go into making mass-produced foods, the horrible conditions under which pigs, cows, and baby chickens are “raised” for consumption, or what the ingredients list said. I was naive, I didn’t know what to look for, and I didn’t really care.

    And while you say you’re making progress, this post makes it sounds like you don’t care either.

    I hesitate to judge the foods you eat, as everyone is entitled to their own choices, but it urge you to seriously think about changing how you eat–I’m not going to pretend that all vegetables will taste amazing if you just gave them a chance; but I do think that your body and your mind will thank you if you take just a moment to be more mindful of what you put in your stomach.

    It may not seem like a big deal now, but your future health depends on what you do today. By the time you end up being affected by the thousands of devil dogs you’ve now consumed, it’ll probably be too late.

    Sorry for the debbie-downer attitude. :\ I guess I really believe that how you eat and what you eat is SO important, and it was surprising and upsetting for me to see that people put such little care into their diet.

    Reply
  2. MaxSilver

    Kim – I have found it hard to care what I eat in college, even asa college athlete. With little to no money, and a schedule it feels the devil himself created, eating healthy meals doesnt always feel like a priority. And I think its good you (and I) are trying to eat better. But really, who cares right now, we have the next 70 years of our lives to eat healthy, why not take advantage of our good metabolisms now and eat what we want when we want?

    Reply
  3. Adeline Guerra

    I’m a little shocked too. Simply because a fast metabolism and being an athlete help you not put on the calories, but while reading your post, I thought, but where does she get all the indispensable nutrients she needs? I know a family in which the eating habits are exactly like yours, and the kids are athletes too. I guess, pizza and pasta do give you energy, but I wonder what the long term effects can be if you don’t get enough iron, or vitamins that don’t seem to be present in processed food and candy.
    I agree with Kate, and I’m not saying this to make you feel bad, but one thing I realized when I stopped eating badly (first year of college, without my parents I ate junk food all the time) was that my body and my muscles are made of what I ingest to a large extent. If I feel toned and healthy, it’s because my food allows my body to find the necessary resources it needs.
    Not being American, one thing I noticed in the US was that working out gave that permission structure to eat junk food with less guilt. But to me, it’s not weight we should be worried about but health.
    I enjoy overindulging from time to time because I think it’s important and I don’t believe in all healthy foods, because it can become an obsession for some people, but I think we often think of our looks before our health. But then again, as we grow older, maybe the reverse starts happening. I hope so at least.

    Reply
  4. Kim

    Kate & Adeline,

    My main point is that not all GenYers are following up with the crazy healthy/organic lifestyles as we can see from Lauren and Max’s comments. I wrote about my particular family habits. And while yes, I am not the most healthy person, I do think that eating what I want, when I want it is a healthy way to live your life. I don’t restrain myself. If I want a devil dog, then I eat a devil dog. If I want a salad, then I eat that. I did learn that I do need vitamins that I don’t get in my diet, so I did started to take a supplement in college. I do agree that people tend to think about their looks as opposed to their health (e.g. I’m thin therefore I can eat crappy foods) which honestly is one of the reasons I never felt a need to eat more healthily, but I also think that some people just want to eat what tastes good. For me, peppers don’t taste good, but BOY, I do love pizza therefore that’s what I am going to do.

    Reply
  5. Adeline Guerra

    I'm a little shocked too. Simply because a fast metabolism and being an athlete help you not put on the calories, but while reading your post, I thought, but where does she get all the indispensable nutrients she needs? I know a family in which the eating habits are exactly like yours, and the kids are athletes too. I guess, pizza and pasta do give you energy, but I wonder what the long term effects can be if you don't get enough iron, or vitamins that don't seem to be present in processed food and candy.
    I agree with Kate, and I'm not saying this to make you feel bad, but one thing I realized when I stopped eating badly (first year of college, without my parents I ate junk food all the time) was that my body and my muscles are made of what I ingest to a large extent. If I feel toned and healthy, it's because my food allows my body to find the necessary resources it needs.
    Not being American, one thing I noticed in the US was that working out gave that permission structure to eat junk food with less guilt. But to me, it's not weight we should be worried about but health.
    I enjoy overindulging from time to time because I think it's important and I don't believe in all healthy foods, because it can become an obsession for some people, but I think we often think of our looks before our health. But then again, as we grow older, maybe the reverse starts happening. I hope so at least.

    Reply

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